Preeclampsia

Preeclampsia

by | May 16th, 2017

Five facts every pregnant woman should know about preeclampsia

PreeclampsiaPreeclampsia is a condition that occurs during pregnancy. A woman with preeclampsia has a serious problem with high blood pressure that can affect her other organs and cause harm to mother and baby if left untreated. Generally, it occurs after the 20th week of pregnancy during the third trimester.

Our Austin obgyns are happy to provide women with information about this potentially dangerous pregnancy condition.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that all pregnant women be screened with blood pressure measurements*, and so you can expect to see the cuff at every prenatal visit.

What our Austin obgyns want women to know about preeclampsia

  1. A woman who develops preeclampsia requires high-risk pregnancy care.

    Our Austin obgyns are experienced high-risk pregnancy care providers. During a high-risk pregnancy, you need to be monitored more frequently and come in for more office visits.

  2. It’s important for every pregnant woman to recognize the symptoms.

    Approximately 5% to 8% of pregnant women will develop preeclampsia, including those who have no known risk factors, so every pregnant woman needs to be aware of the symptoms.

    • Persistent headache
    • Swollen hands or face
    • Upper abdominal pain or shoulder pain
    • Vision problems—blurriness, seeing spots or auras
    • Breathing problems
    • Nausea and vomiting, especially after week 20
  3. First-time moms have an increased risk for developing preeclampsia.

    Researchers cannot pinpoint the cause of preeclampsia, but there are certain factors that increase a woman’s risk.

    • First-time pregnancies
    • Family history of preeclampsia
    • A maternal history of chronic high blood pressure or kidney disease
    • Multiple pregnancy
    • Obesity
    • A history of diabetes or lupus
    • A pregnancy at age 40+
  4. Preeclampsia can cause preterm birth and other complications for baby.

    Preeclampsia causes risks for the baby. The baby may need to be delivered early, especially if preeclampsia develops early in the pregnancy. The condition can also affect the baby’s growth because it can cause the blood flow to the placenta to be restricted.

  5. Preeclampsia can lead to complications for the mother, including HELLP syndrome

    HELLP syndrome is a complication that causes impaired blood clotting, damage to red blood cells, and bleeding of the liver. This is a very serious complication that occurs in approximately 5% to 12% of mothers who have preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia is a serious condition, but rest assured, our Austin obgyns have the knowledge and the experience to manage high-risk pregnancies. Contact us today.

*http://www.medpagetoday.com/OBGYN/Pregnancy/64803

About

Renaissance Women’s Group has brought thousands of babies into the world. Our ObGyns have over 200 years of combined experience caring for women as they plan for and experience pregnancy. Our team consists of board certified obstetricians and gynecologists who believe in empowering our patients to make informed decisions about their health, care and treatment options. Dr. Melanie Collins, Dr. Clarissa Gutierrez, Dr. Kimberly Loar, Dr. Laura Meritt, Dr. Devin Garza, Dr. Tara Mills, Dr. Jessica MacLeod and Dr. Ginger Truitt provide expert, supportive obstetrical care for women from our North Austin, Bastrop and Cedar Park offices. Dr. Byron Darby provides prenatal diagnosis and ultrasound services, and Dr. Sherry Neyman specializes in gynecologic services.
http://rwgdocs.com

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